From the Log of Persevere : San Blas Islands and the Panama Canal

By Colin Rath

Editor’s note: This is the thirteenth installment in a series of dispatches from the Rath family (Colin & Pam, daughters Breana, Mariel and Nerina), who departed Stamford, CT in the fall of 2014 for a worldwide cruise aboard their Hanse 545 Persevere. You’ll find previous articles linked below.

PersevereThe San Blas Islands, located in the Caribbean off the northern coast of Panama, are a paradise from a lost time. They consist of 400 cays that are the property of the Kuna Indians. The Kuna only actually inhabit 49 of the islands, so you can find your own unpopulated oasis pretty much everywhere. These are beautiful islands, but treacherous since there are encircled with reefs everywhere that aren’t particularly well represented on the charts, which meant that Breana and Pam spent a lot of time on the bow, yelling directions based on what they could see in the crystal clear water…which is always fun when you draw 9 feet.

The girls enjoyed trying on colorful Kuna dresses in the San Blas Islands. © persevere60545.com
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From the Log of Persevere: Central America

By Colin Rath

Editor’s note: This is the fourteenth installment in a series of dispatches from the Rath family (Colin & Pam, daughters Breana, Meriel and Nerina), who departed Stamford, CT in the fall of 2014 for a worldwide cruise aboard their Hanse 545 Persevere. You’ll find previous articles linked below.

PersevereI know everyone thought that we left the states in October 2014 with a windfall of cash, sailing off into the sunset, but that was the Disney version of our exit. At the time I penned my book It Is What It Is, it looked like our fortune had finally changed with the condo under contact for sale coupled with a legally dismissed 2.7 million dollar mortgage. We thought that after a decade, we had successfully escaped our construction saga.

Breana Rath checks out the Battery Baird fortification near the Panama Canal.   © persevere60545.com
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Ten Reasons to Sail Into Rockland, Maine This Summer

By Molly Mulhern

Rockland Public Landing1. We all like a nice, easy approach to a harbor, and Rockland provides just that. The piloting is simple. The Owls Head Lighthouse marks the outer entry point on the south, and the Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse provides the north-side mark. Once past the breakwater lighthouse, you have plenty of choices for where to land. You can sail in directly from the breakwater to the eastern side of the mooring field and drop your hook there (Anchorage C on Chart 13307_1), or if you want more privacy, head south toward the Owls Head shore (Anchorage A).

There is ample dockage at the Rockland Public Landing on non-festival weekends and most weeknights.   © Molly Mulhern

If you prefer to grab a mooring closer to the heart of Rockland, contact the Rockland Harbormaster (207-594-0312). There is a launch service aboard the Ginny T, [named after the club’s first female commodore] 8 am to 8 pm in summer, VHF Channel 9 or 207-233-2800) run by the Rockland Yacht Club that will grab you off your boat and deliver you just about anywhere in the harbor for a nominal fee.

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The Boating Barrister: Bob Marley and the Lemon Boat

By John K. Fulweiler

Monsieur Marley was spot on when he sang about how everything is just for a while.  (“Real Situation,” Uprising by Bob Marley & the Wailers on Island Records, 1980) He’s a right Rastafarian, but I can’t catch his tune. All my life (and it’s a problem) I build and create for some sort of transatlantic passage when I know my voyage is just a port-to-port call. I reach for 3M’s 5200 when simple caulk would do; I spin a lock washer on when it’ll be thirty years before that nut ever backs off; I spray the third coat; I rig a secondary fuel filter. Heck, it’s like I’m prepping for a lifetime when I’m already more than halfway through the one I’ve been allotted. Problem is, anything less works at me. 

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From the Log of Persevere: Carnival in Martinique

By Colin Rath

Editor’s note: This is the thirteenth installment in a series of dispatches from the Rath family (Colin & Pam, daughters Breana, Meriel and Nerina), who departed Stamford, CT in the fall of 2014 for a worldwide cruise aboard their Hanse 545 Persevere. You’ll find previous articles at linked below.

Persevere MartiniqueWe arrived in Martinique at 4 am and decided to head into the marina. We were advised not to do this since the harbor is full of sandbars and reefs, but the girls had had enough of the choppy seas and wanted to sleep motionless for once. We entered very slowly, and with the aid of GPS docking was semi-easily achieved. We could see the shells of other boats that were not as successful.

Just a few of the many costumed Carnival performers. © persevere60545.com

The cats immediately jumped ship upon landing at the gas dock for dry stationary land (no worries, they returned later when they were hungry – no desertion here). The next morning we were greeted by the other Atlantic Odyssey boats when we docked at our slip; rum punch and celebration began. “Welcome to the Caribbean,” as Capt. Jack Sparrow says. It was Carnival time anyway. We got the local bus and water taxi over to Port de France to join in. This is a three-day celebration with dance groups from all over the island strutting their best with food and drink.

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Toss Your Calendar Before Heading Offshore

Patience is the key to planning your passage home from Bermuda

By Andrew Burton

Newport BermudaI enjoyed the interview with John Roumaniere in the April issue of WindCheck. John’s words are always worth paying attention to, especially if you have the pleasure of doing so in person. I would like to add a little from my own experience to his comments about Safety at Sea and returning boats home after the Newport Bermuda Race. 

Hunkered down under deep-reefed main and staysail the Swan 59 EMK heads north toward the Stream. We could have carried more sail, but sacrificing a knot of boatspeed gave us a much safer and comfortable ride.
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Destination: Milford, CT

By Priscilla Lynn

Milford HarborThe town of Milford, Connecticut has the longest shoreline in the state and a sheltered harbor with a well-marked, wide channel. With a boating season that runs from May through November, visitors arriving from around the world find themselves in a unique location – one of the few harbors located right in the heart of a beautiful and historic downtown district. 

Looking south from the mouth of Milford Harbor.  © Chris Carveth
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Sailing is in my blood, but I learned what I know from my dad

By Rick Mannoia

I learned what I know from my dadWe’ve been a sailing family since the early 1960s. My dad’s first sailboat was a single sail ‘Sea Snark.’ The Snark was a small Styrofoam boat…similar to a Sunfish, but not nearly as sailable. We bought it for $50 from a guy down the street from our house in East Islip, NY and carried it home. We were so happy... our first boat! I helped my dad fiberglass it to keep the Styrofoam from falling apart. We’d carry it on top of our 1959 Studebaker Lark down to the Connetquot River for launching.

The author’s father, John Mannoia, steers Queen Mamie Too while his son Taylor trims the mainsheet.
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Singles Under Sail has a Busy Season Planned

By Joy Sherman

Singles Under SailWith new board members elected for 2016, Singles Under Sail Club is ramping up its summer boating and social calendar. SUS has been in operation since 1987, with the mission of bringing single people with an interest in boating and sailing together, and providing opportunities to share those activities.

Singles Under Sail members hosting a fundraiser for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society   © singlesundersail.org
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Salty Dawg Rally™ Summer Cruising Events

Salty Dawg RallyThe Salty Dawg Rally™, a Bristol, RI-based non-profit organization dedicated to offshore sailing education, safety and communication, and building camaraderie among blue water sailors, will host three cruising events on the East Coast this summer.

© saltydawgrally.org
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