aug1615-CRCI-0005_656_Web_Banner_728x90_FINAL_3.gif

Windward Mark Roundings

by CLEMMIE EVERETT

Using your sails and your weight to steer the boat around a windward mark will help keep you out in front. © Spectrum Photo/Fran Grenon

A lot of sailors think hard about the start, and talk a lot about upwind speed and playing windshifts, but often the process of rounding the windward mark and transitioning onto the downwind leg gets lost in the shuffle. In sailboat racing, every tiny bit counts, and having a clean and successful windward mark rounding can gain you valuable boatlengths. The keys to rounding the windward mark are to make sure that you get there without sailing extra distance or fouling someone, and ensuring that you’re prepared for the next leg.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Downwind Technique in High School Sailing

By CLEMMIE EVERETT

Although there are no spinnakers in high school sailing, the downwind legs are far from a parade to the next mark or the finish; with good technique, you can make significant gains. To be aware of and to react to strategic considerations such as the effects of current or better wind pressure and tactical considerations such as getting inside overlaps on other boats, both skipper and crew need to keep their heads outside the boat throughout a reach or run. But to get your boat where you want it to be, you need to maintain top boatspeed through jibes and transitions between reaching and sailing dead downwind. 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Having Fun and Winning Races

by TAYLOR WALKER

It has been proven time and time again that crew morale is often one of the key factors to success in big boat races. Looking back on Team Chance’s performance at Spring Off Soundings in early June, the fleet faced both extremes in terms of sailing conditions. The Friday race to Block Island was sailed in light, shifty breezes, and many boats in the fleet did a lot more drifting than sailing.With hot, sticky weather and no breeze, attitudes often start coming out and crew tension can rise quickly.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Last Beat Strategy and Tactics

by CLEMMIE EVERETT

No matter what happens over the course of a race, your ultimate finishing position depends on how you sail the last leg of the race. People often talk about starting strategy and first beat strategy, but it’s also useful to think about considerations for the last leg, which is often a beat to weather.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Organization is the Key to a Successful Junior Program

by STEWART ARNOLD

The month of June is typically accompanied by the hustle and bustle of junior sailing program preparation. With all this being crammed into the last week or two, organization and planning for your program becomes crucial. Widespread confusion is not uncommon, and can reach everyone from instructors to parents and sailors. There are certain things we can all do as parents, sailors, instructors and program directors to reduce this confusion and start off the summer on the right tack!

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Team Racing Basics Part 2: Passbacks and Mark Traps

Once you know your team racing combinations and plays, you need to know how to create those combinations through passbacks and mark traps.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Team Racing Basics: Know Your Combination

Coordination and communication between skipper and crew as well as between teammates is essential.

If you’re participating in a high school sailing program this spring, you’re probably trying to make sense of team racing. Even if you have team raced before, early spring is always a good time for a refresher. Team racing on the high school level involves six boats, ‘three on a team’ and the objective is to finish with fewer points than your opponent. This often means that, counter to your habits from fleet racing, there will be situations on the race course when it is to your advantage to slow down or even stop your boat, as well as situations where you will let others (your teammates) pass you on the racecourse.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Make your coaching dollars go farther!

Coaching is a crucial ingredient of success in any sport. As sailboat racing has become more mainstream, and thus more competitive, top-level coaching has become just about a necessity. For all ages and all skills, to get better we all need coaching. There are areas of our sport where coaching is overused, and a sailor’s money (or their parents’) is either virtually wasted or at least could have been far better spent.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

5Ps - Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Performance

coaches cornerThis isn’t an earth-shattering concept. Start preparing for your sailing season now, and when it gets here you’ll have a better time. Winter finally breaks in March and no matter what blizzard Mother Nature hurls at us, we know warmer days are coming. With summer on its way, here are some things that you can do now to help prevent any stressful last minute regatta panics.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

You Gotta be Fit to be Fast!

(c) Walter Cooper/US SAILINGAs a Laser sailor competing on the ISAF Sailing World Cup circuit, I see what it takes to truly become a world-class athlete. Competing at the top level, in any class, requires countless hours of practice and preparation. Spending a lot of time on the water before heading to a regatta will certainly help you move up in the fleet. Being prepared and organized can reduce unnecessary breakdowns. Outfitting your boat with the best gear and new sails can help you move up a couple more. Physical fitness can mean the difference between a podium finish and a mediocre regatta. Beyond being able to hike harder and longer, sailing fit will help you make better decisions. When we are tired, it can be easy to lose focus of the big picture during a race. This could be anything from spotting wind shifts to positioning yourself in the fleet or rounding the favored gate mark.
Read more
Add your reaction Share

Drysuits_for_Windcheck_online_Final.jpg
MyTaskit_300x250-1.gif

defendersept16_EV-100_300x250.jpg

2016-LandfallTentSale-andBoatSwap_windcheck-300x250.jpg

QKW2017_Windcheck_300x250.jpg

Click_here_to_download_our_September_2016_issue.png