Save the Sound Dispatch

Save the Sound Dispatch

Making the Grades

By Chris Szepessy

Making the Grades

By David Seigerman, Clean Water Communications Specialist Dr. Caterina Panzeca was unfazed by the technical aspects of collecting water quality data in Westchester Creek. Her initial concern was the early morning timing. “Wrangling college students, at that hour, over the summer . . .” Dr. Panzeca said, not needing to finish her thought. “But the students were actually super excited to get up.”’ Of course they were amped and ready to get on the water. If you’re…

Save the Sound Dispatch

The Clean Water Act: 50 years of Cleaning Up the Sound . . . and Counting

By Chris Szepessy

The Clean Water Act: 50 years of Cleaning Up the Sound . . . and Counting

The fall of 1972 was a time for inauspicious starts. Particularly on Long Island. The New York Islanders debuted that year and suffered through one of the worst seasons in National Hockey League history. A young musician from Hicksville hit the road for Los Angeles, where he toiled in a piano lounge and took notes. And on October 18, 1972, the Clean Water Act became law, ambitiously seeking in its first stated goal, “that the discharge of…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Where Did 300,000 Fish Go? 

By Chris Szepessy

Where Did 300,000 Fish Go? 

By Melissa Pappas, Save the Sound Ecological Communications Specialist Not too long ago, millions of river herring swam through Connecticut’s rivers each spring. These silver highways of fish making their way back to the place they were hatched were showing signs of rebounding after decades of decline. Last year, Jon Vander Werff, Save the Sound’s fish biologist, counted almost 200 alewife, the larger of the two species of river herring, in a trap at Konold’s Pond on…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Save the Sound Dispatch: New Lab Brings New Possibilities

By Chris Szepessy

Save the Sound Dispatch: New Lab Brings New Possibilities

By David Seigerman, clean water communications specialist     At its ribbon cutting back in April, the John and Daria Barry Foundation Water Quality Lab gleamed with possibility. But like a racehorse in a stall or boat tucked safely in its slip, some things can’t fully be appreciated while they are at rest. This summer, Save the Sound’s new lab facility—the state-of-the-art centerpiece of our new office space in Larchmont, NY—is humming with activity, alive not only…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Save the Sound Dispatch: Keeping the Clean Water Act Active

By Chris Szepessy

Save the Sound Dispatch: Keeping the Clean Water Act Active

By David Seigerman, clean water communications specialist Drinkable, Fishable, Swimmable.   Sounds pretty simple, doesn’t it? Straightforward, unassailable, as fundamental as those other guiding principle triplets: “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness” or “Truth, Justice, and the American Way.” It seems the least we can expect from the water that we drink, pull food from, play in, and sail on, is that it be clean and safe. That’s what the Clean Water Act (officially, the Federal…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Plum Island scientific dive report catalogs “a surprising diversity of life”

By Chris Szepessy

Plum Island scientific dive report catalogs “a surprising diversity of life”

By Kathy Czepiel, lands communications specialist, Save the Sound   Last fall, we wrote about a 2021 scientific dive off the coast of Plum Island, NY. Now the results are in, and they provide a deeper understanding of findings from an earlier dive while documenting 126 species of plants and animals beneath the surface of Long Island Sound. The report, Survey of Plum Island’s Subtidal Marine Habitats, was prepared by the New York Natural Heritage Program (NYNHP)…

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A Living Shoreline for Big Rock

By Chris Szepessy

A Living Shoreline for Big Rock

By Katie Friedman, NY ecological restoration program manager, and Melissa Pappas, ecological communications specialist Coastal communities, home to almost a third of Americans1, are facing sea level rise and erosion. While we may think of these consequences as distant and future threats, they are already taking hold of local communities.   Artistic rendering provided by GEI and DMEA.   The residents of Douglas Manor, a community in Queens, New York, have not ignored these threats; rather, they…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Launching Connecticut’s National Estuarine Research Reserve

By Chris Szepessy

Launching Connecticut’s National Estuarine Research Reserve

By Jamie Vaudrey, UConn; Kevin O’Brien, CT DEEP; and Anthony Allen, Save the Sound On January 14, 2022, the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that a network of state-owned properties in southeastern Connecticut and portions of the surrounding waters was designated as the nation’s 30th National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR). The NERR System is a network of coastal sites across the country designated to protect and study estuarine systems. Established through the Coastal Zone Management…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Cleanup Effort Rebounds as Fight Against Plastics Continues

By Chris Szepessy

Cleanup Effort Rebounds as Fight Against Plastics Continues

By Anthony Allen, Save the Sound Assistant Director of Ecological Restoration After the exceptional challenges of the annual Connecticut Coastal Cleanup in 2020, a record-breaking 2021 cleanup season brought a welcome dose of energy and reason for hope. The statewide cleanup effort, coordinated by Save the Sound and led by volunteers each year since 2002, held a limited number of in-person events and pivoted to a hybrid model that included “virtual” cleanups in 2020. The volunteers came…

Save the Sound Dispatch

Data Drives Decision-Making

By Chris Szepessy

Data Drives Decision-Making

Five Years of the Unified Water Study By Peter Linderoth, Director of Water Quality, Save the Sound The completion of the 2021 Unified Water Study season marks the fifth anniversary of this Long Island Sound-wide water quality monitoring program and the collaboration continues to grow! Launched by Save the Sound in 2017, the Unified Water Study (UWS) is a groundbreaking water quality monitoring program developed so groups around the Sound can collect comparable data on the environmental…

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