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Up to Speed & Smarts: Basic Principles for Rounding Marks

By David Dellenbaugh

Rounding MarksIf you want your mark roundings to be quick and safe, there are certain strategies that work almost every time. For example, you should round each mark close enough that you could reach out and touch it. You should locate the next mark visually before you round this one. And you should definitely develop a strategic plan for the next leg before you round any mark.

Round every mark close enough to touch it, like MudRatz 420 sailors Zach Champney (helm) and Peter Cronin, pictured at the Buzzards Bay Regatta. It’s amazing how wide many boats go around marks. In most cases, they lose double the amount of distance they leave between them and the mark. They sail a certain distance past the mark and then they have to sail that far again just to get back to the mark. To minimize distance sailed, it’s important to round close to every mark. Of course, there are a few times when it’s OK to be farther from the mark – like at a windward mark in breeze when you need enough space to ease your main, or at a leeward mark when you are trying to do an ‘end-run’ around a pack of boats. But a good rule of thumb is that you should round each mark close enough that you can reach over and touch it. To get into this position you may have to slow down so you are right behind the boat ahead, but this ensures that you will sail the shortest course, and it gives you more tactical options and clearer air after the mark.  © J. Cronin - OutrageousPhotography.net

 

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Spitfire Wins Sonar NAs

Sonar North American's SpitfireThirty-seven boats contested the 2018 Jaguar Range Rover Sonar North American Championship, which was hosted by Noroton Yacht Club in Darien, CT September 13 - 16. Four races were sailed on Friday, but racing was cancelled Saturday and Sunday due to lack of wind.

From left to right are Greg Stevens, Libby Alexander, Karl Ziegler, Bruce Kirby (designer of the Sonar), Peter Galloway (with hat, from whom the trophy is named), Bill Crane, and Noroton YC Commodore Tom Ross. Photo courtesy of Rick Bannerot © 2018
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The JYRALIS Reunion: You Can Go Home Again

JYRALIS ReunionOver 120 former members of the Junior Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound gathered on Saturday, September 8, 2018 under the Pandemonium at Larchmont Yacht Club, scene of many great dances during their junior sailing days.

 Reg Pierce, Jeff Neuberth and Paige Neubereth (Indian Harbor).   © Bill Sandberg

The day began, naturally, with racing in Ideal 18s provided by LYC. Each team had a special connection – lifelong sailing pals Rich duMoulin and Elliot Oldak (both Knickerbocker YC); Instructor Bill Sandberg (American) and pupil Lili Jenkins (Noroton); the husband and wife team of Joan & Butch Hitchcock (American) and the brother/sister team of Monica Stautner Nichols and John Stautner (Indian Harbor). The Race Committee consisted of Jol Everett (American), Bizzy Monte-Sano (Larchmont), Ellen Isbrandtsen (Indian Harbor) and Nick Langone (Larchmont).

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Record Run The Vineyard Race Aboard Argo

By Chad Corning

ArgoWhere the 2017 edition of Stamford Yacht Club’s Vineyard Race featured dream conditions with a fresh northerly prevailing for most of the race, 2018 was much harder work with a brisk easterly featuring for the trip out to the tower. After taking their medicine, the fleet was largely disappointed as the easterly faded away to nothing making this year’s 84th running a long and testing contest.

The crew of Jason Carroll’s MultiOneDesign70 Argo – Westy Barlow, Jim Condon, Chad Corning, Thierry Fouchier, Sidney Gavignet, Scott Norris, Anderson Reggio and Alister Richardson – set a new course record for the 238-nautical mile Vineyard Race with an elapsed time of 14 hours, 58 minutes and 19 seconds. That’s an average speed of 15.9 knots!  © Kevin Dailey/KevinDaileyImages.com

We had quite a few challenges on Jason Carroll’s new MOD70 trimaran Argo. First and foremost, the boat was purchased just three weeks prior to the race and was in Lorient, France. A perfect delivery window opened up and the boat had a mostly downwind run on the southern route, sailing 4,000 miles to Newport, RI in a bit over ten days. A fairly frantic maintenance period ensued, and with fitting some new sails along with some minor miracles, the boat departed Newport the day before the August 31 start.

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Up to Speed & Smarts: Assess Your Risk Level at the Start

By David Dellenbaugh

Starting line racing Every race is full of choices. You can go to the left side or the right; start at the pin end or in the middle; cover the other boats or sail your own race; duck a starboard tacker or lee-bow them. The chance to make hundreds of choices in each race is part of the challenge and fun of sailing.

You don’t have to win the start to win the race.  © Clagett Regatta/Ro Fernandez

Each of the decisions that you make in a race involves a certain amount of risk. If you go all the way to the left corner you may lose everyone on the right. If you start in the middle (where it’s harder to judge the line), you might be OCS. Risk is not inherently good or bad. But if you don’t think about your own situation and how much risk you are willing, or need, to take, then your choices may not turn out to be very successful.

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Whitebread XXV is September 29, 2018

By Andrew Shemella

WhitebreadTwenty-five years! Wow, that’s a lot of years for a regatta that was started by five guys sitting around a table in a bar. The Sailing Instructions were written on a napkin, and they were just the course. Ten boats sailed in the original rendition of the Peconic Bay Sailing Association’s (PBSA) Whitebread Race. It must have been a good idea, because the race quickly grew to over 100 entries. It wasn’t long before there was a post-race party, and then a band and a barbecue.

© RJ LaBella/RJLaBellaPhotos.com
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Ideal 18 North Americans are September 29 & 30, 2018

Ideal 18The best Ideal 18 sailors from fleets up and down Long Island Sound, Rochester, NY and the Chesapeake will be converging on Larchmont Yacht Club in Larchmont, NY the last weekend of September for two days of racing to determine the 2018 North American Champion.

A limited number of boats are available for charter on a first-come basis. When possible, competitors who are members of clubs providing boats for the charter pool will be assigned boats from their respective clubs.

© Mary Alice Fisher/maryalicefisher.com
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NYYC American Magic Announces Roster for 36th America’s Cup

New York Yacht Club American MagicNew York Yacht Club American Magic, the U.S. Challenger for the 36th America’s Cup, has announced an initial roster of 17 sailors who will train and compete with the team. The accomplished group includes nine Americans and sailors from four other nations. The 36th America’s Cup will take place in March 2021 off Auckland, New Zealand. The regatta will be sailed in the AC75 class, a new 75-foot foiling boat designed specifically for the next edition of the Cup that is expected to race with a crew of 11 sailors.

If things go NYYC American Magic's way in Auckland, the New York Yacht Club’s Harbor Court clubhouse in Newport might host subsequent America’s Cup regattas for years to come.   Photo © Dan Nerney 
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Champions Crowned at The Clagett and U.S. Para Sailing Championships

By Sam Crichton 

Clagett and US Para SailingForty-six sailors from across North America competed in the 16th C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. Memorial Clinic & Regatta and the 2018 U.S. Para Sailing Championships, which were hosted by Sail Newport in Newport, RI June 20 - 24, 2018.

With 22 sailors, the singlehanded 2.4mR class was the largest fleet in the 16th C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. Memorial Clinic & Regatta and the 2018 U.S. Para Sailing Championships.   © Ro Fernandez 

“We’ve just concluded the 16th Clagett Regatta and we couldn’t do it without the support of the volunteers, sponsors, supporters and especially the sailors,” said Clagett President and Co-Founder Judy Clagett McLennan (Portsmouth, RI). “We’re so thrilled that we’ve been able to join forces with US Sailing to host the U.S. Para Sailing Championships this year. We are working together to demonstrate the interest in sailing and to get it reinstated to the Paralympics.”

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Stonewall Sails Regatta

By Julia Miller

NEW_Stonewall_image_for_web.jpgHudson River Community Sailing (HRCS) and the Knickerbocker Sailing Association (KSA) came together on June 23, 2018 to celebrate the 15th Annual Stonewall Sails Regatta. What began as a gray and cloudy day brightened when a wave of 30 racers donning rainbow flags appeared in the HRCS boathouse on Pier 66 in Manhattan.

Gloomy skies and light air failed to diminish the enthusiasm of participants in the 15th Annual Stonewall Sails Regatta.   © Tom Kluepfel
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WindCheck October 2018

Click here to download WindCheck's October 2018 issue. (File is 5MB)