Mission Blue: A Wish Big Enough to Change the World

by DEB CASTELLANA

It’s early January of 2012 – one year ago. While most of us are still struggling to come back from our holiday overindulgences, Dr. Sylvia Earle is on the move. Diminutive only in stature, 77- year old powerhouse and marine explorer Dr. Earle is boarding the plane that will take her on an expedition to one of the largest marine sanctuaries in the world, Papahãnaumokuãkea Marine National Monument, known to most of us as the Northwest Hawaiian Islands or Midway.

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Greening the Fleet

by JOSHUA HAGGARTY AND DAN ALBANI, UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHYR/V Endeavor © techserv.gso.uri.edu

In 2010, as carbon emissions produced by human activities rose well over 3% in the U.S. to 5,638 million metric tons of CO2, the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) decided to explore ways to make their fleet’s present and future more environmentally sustainable. UNOLS began to promote the goal of “greening the fleet,” which is exploring the technologies and best practices to develop and maintain more efficient research vessels. The Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) at URI has taken this goal to heart, and research is currently underway to make their vessel, the R/V Endeavor, one of the most eco-friendly ships in the nation’s academic fleet.

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NOAA’s New Northeast Chief’s first official act - Undermining the Marine Mammal Protection Act?

Against the recommendations of the federally appointed Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Team, John

Harbor porpoise, a by-catch of commercial fishing, are often caught and suffocate in gillnets. © A. Reckendorf/WDC

Harbor porpoise, a by-catch of commercial fishing, are often caught and suffocate in gillnets. © A. Reckendorf/WDC

 Bullard, the newly named Northeast Fisheries Administrator, recently announced that he is circumventing the process set out by the Marine Mammal Protection Act to reduce by-catch (incidental death) of harbor porpoise.

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Engaging the Public, Business, the Regulators and Environmental Groups: NAMEPA After Five Years

© Allen Clark/PhotoBoat.comThe North American Marine Environment Protection Association (NAMEPA) is a maritime industry-led initiative which operates as a voluntary, non-profit and nongovernmental organization committed to preserving the marine environment through educating seafarers, port communities and students about the need, and strategies, for protecting this important global resource and engages maritime businesses, government and the public to “Save our Seas” by promoting sound environmental practices. For more information, visit namepa.net. It is headquartered in Southport, CT.

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Rozalia Project Summer 2012 Trash Tour: A lot of marine debris and amazing interns!

by REBECCA INVER MOFFA Education-based activities for kids in grades 3-12 is integral to Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean’s mission is to find and remove marine debris, from the surface to the sea floor, through action, technology, outreach and research. © rozaliaproject.org

What an amazing 2012 Summer Trash Tour we’ve had at Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean! Starting June 3, we boarded our 60-foot mothership American Promise: Captain Kyle Vowels, first mate Sloane Suciu, interns Kayla Lubold, Laura Dunphy and Blais Hickey, Rozalia Project’s director Rachael Miller and me, the Science and Education Coordinator. Over the next few weeks we towed our nueston net off the Isles of Shoals, removed thousands of pieces of trash from beaches on Frenchboro Island and beaches around Kittery, ME and Portsmouth, NH. We also tested out our new low bycatch neuston tow device called a Baleen Basker (bioengineered design based on a basking shark and baleen whale). During the first few weeks of this session we also had some other interns – Andrew Randazzo and Connor Grant – assist us with our marine debris removal, research and education.

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Saving the Sound

by CONOR GRANT

The Long Island Sound is one of the world’s most beautiful bodies of water. With its striking coastline and beautiful coastal towns and its convenient location between Connecticut and Long Island, the Sound is a popular spot for boaters, sunbathers, fishermen, and all variety of outdoor enthusiasts. For all those who have spent time in the area, it will come as no surprise that more than four million people have chosen to make their home in the coastal communities of the Sound. These four million people make the coastal landscape of Long Island Sound a vibrant and exciting one, but it is important to remember that the Long Island Sound is home to more than just people. In fact, the wildlife population within the Sound dwarfs the sizeable human population that surrounds it. 

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Senate Panel Passes Legislation to Protect Long Island Sound

Without Passage of Legislation, Long Island Sound Stands To Lose Millions In Federal Dollars

On June 22, U.S. Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D - NY), a member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Charles E. Schumer (D - NY), Joseph Lieberman (I - CT) and Richard Blumenthal (D - CT) announced a key Senate panel’s passage of legislation to bring federal dollars to support the restoration of Long Island Sound.

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Clean The Bay is Expanding Operations Into Connecticut

Clean The Bay, a Rhode Island-based non-profit environmental organization that specializes in removing large debris from the shoreline, is headed back to Connecticut. Clean The Bay crews are scheduled to clean areas of shoreline in the Mystic, Stonington and Little Narragansett Bay areas.

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The Search for Megalops

Become a Part of The Sound School’s Connecticut Blue Crab Population Habitat Study 2010-2015

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Grading the Sound

by LEAH SCHMALZ AND KYLA MILES

In January, Save the Sound, a program of Connecticut Fund for the Environment, released its 2011 State of the Sound Report. The first of its kind, the report issues grades measuring the efforts put forth by Connecticut and New York to protect and preserve Long Island Sound. 

Long Island Sound

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