Letter: Why knot?

After reading the review of Voyages in the January/February 2016 issue of WindCheck (thank you very much!), I settled down to read much of the rest of the issue. Specifically, I was reading the article “On the Bus with Joe Harris” on pages 54 & 55.

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Letter - Good On Ya!

Editor’s note: Our interview with sailor, author, historian, and safety-at-sea pioneer John Rousmaniere appeared in our March issue. In case you missed it, you’ll find here.

I’m Joe Rousmaniere, one of John’s many younger brothers. I am now a weekend sailor – one weekend every 15 years – but when I was a kid we went sailing with John often enough, usually when he couldn’t  find any other crew.

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Letter: An Interview with John Rousmaniere

I’m Joe Rousmaniere, one of John’s many younger brothers. I am now a weekend sailor-one weekend every 15 years-but when I was a kid we went sailing with John often enough, usually when he couldn’t find any other crew.

Seared into my memory was a time we had a nice easy passage south on the Cape Cod Canal, the sun was warm and all was smooth… When we came out into Buzzard’s Bay we were met with a violent squall and terrifying waves. Going below and curling up in a bunk not being an option for me, John shouted at me to do this and do that, including a death defying sail change on the foredeck that left me a wreck.

All throughout he was enthusing about how we were handling the boat and the wind and the seas. He actually enjoyed it! Here it is 50 years later and he still enjoys it! Good on him.

Read our interview with John.

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Editor's Log: Seizing Opportunity

Sailing is indeed an abundant provider of great things. I recently had a reminder of this while competing in the inaugural Miami to Havana Race. As often happens in the early morning hours offshore, I reflected on how I’d gotten there. No matter what the conditions, it seems that toward the end of watch I seem to settle into a calm, contemplative mode (likely just exhaustion). As first light approached on a churning and active sea, with flying fish sputtering above the waves and the eerie Portuguese Man-o-War sailing along, I thought about my family.

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Editor's Log: Raise a Glass to Paul Risseeuw

In an age where vast amounts of information are available with a few clicks, the subtleties of actually learning the correct way to do something are often taken for granted or even lost. Consequently, we too often rely on the work of faceless others to show us the ‘how-to’s’ in life. Luckily, there are still plenty of hands-on doers and mentors in sailing. These are the people that keep our sport thriving.

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Letter: Dead reckoning

Editor’s note: For more than a year, we’ve been publishing Colin Rath’s “From the Log of Persevere” stories, in which he’s chronicling a worldwide cruise with his wife and three daughters.

What an amazing adventure! I always wanted to do this with my kids too, but one is in college already and the other two can’t agree on anything. I used to be a nanny and I speak broken Dutch. Too bad I’m stuck at my boring old job, or I’d want to be a tutor…Anyway, enjoy your adventures. We dullards back in the states are very impressed.

Margot Geitheim, via email

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Letter: Count ‘em on one hand

Editor’s note: In his most recent Coop’s Corner column, “Analog Digits,” Contributing Editor Joe Cooper asked whether inventions that purport to make sailing easier, such as “electronic sail trim,” are what sailors really need.

This is so correct. When I began sailing it involved me doing things: coordination, timing, analysis, figuring out where I was, and so on. It was pretty low-tech compared to what we have today, but at the time I thought Loran C was awesome and I still had to plot on a paper chart. Fast-forward to plotters and routes and dog knows what else the new electronics provide. I do have an autopilot, but one on which I program the heading, not some GPS. I don’t use routes because I sail and fetch one mark at time and 99.999% of the time I have ample time to set the next waypoint. My electronic ADDs are more or less “crew” for me.

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Letter: Wherever the current takes you

Editor’s note: In our Holiday 2015 issue, Derek Rupe described how replacing the diesel engine in his 30-footer with an electric motor led to his founding a company, Captineer, to help others do the same. The letter below exemplifies the very positive response that “Watts Up”   has generated.

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Editor’s Log: Learn as You Go

The other night, after a round of proofreading the magazine that you’re reading, I watched one of my favorite movies. In a scene from The Freshman, Matthew Broderick’s character Clark Kellogg is a college student thrust into a daunting situation after being robbed the minute he arrives in New York City to begin film school. Accepting a shady job from a would-be mafia boss in hopes of recouping some of his  loss and the web of issues it creates, Clark is clearly overwhelmed.

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Letter: Dolphin’s winning ways

Tom Darling’s article, “Team Dolphin Takes the Vintage Day Racer Prize in the Opera House Cup,” rekindled fond memories for a reader who raced on this legendary Herreshoff Newport 29 for many years and admires the beautiful restoration by Donn Costanzo of Wooden Boatworks in Greenport, NY.

Congrats Team Dolphin…Donn, the boat looks great! I remember doing that race back in the 1970s with John Lockwood driving! The article should have included a paragraph about all of those wins! The Lockwood family of New Suffolk, NY owned, cared for and aggressively raced Dolphin from the late ‘40s thru the mid ‘90s (my dates might need a little tweaking) and should be recognized for making Dolphin the “Winningest Boat on the Water!”

Regards,

Ed Lesnikowski (crewmember early ‘70s through the early ‘90s), Mattituck, NY

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